Summer and the City (2011)

Summer is a magical time in New York City and Carrie is in love with all of it—the crazy characters in her neighborhood, the vintage-clothing boutiques, the wild parties, and the glamorous man who has swept her off her feet. Best of all, she’s finally in a real writing class, taking her first steps toward fulfilling her dream.

This sequel to "The Carrie Diaries" brings surprising revelations as Carrie learns to navigate her way around the Big Apple, going from being a country “sparrow”-- as Samantha Jones dubs her-- to the person she always wanted to be. But as it becomes increasingly difficult to reconcile her past with her future, Carrie realizes that making it in New York is much more complicated than she ever imagined. 

With her signature wit and sparkling humor, Candace Bushnell reveals the irresistible story of how Carrie met Samantha and Miranda, and what turned a small-town girl into one of the New York City’s most unforgettable icons, Carrie Bradshaw.


The Carrie Diaries (2010)

"The Carrie Diaries" is the coming-of-age story of one of the most iconic characters of our generation.

Before Sex and the City, Carrie Bradshaw was a small town girl who knew she wanted more. She’s ready for real life to start, but first she must navigate her senior year of high school. Up until now, Carrie and her friends have been inseparable. Then Sebastian Kydd comes into the picture, and a friend’s betrayal makes her question everything.

With an unforgettable cast of characters, "The Carrie Diaries" is the story of how a regular girl learns to think for herself, and evolves into a sharp, insightful writer. Readers will learn about her family background, how she found her writing voice, and the indelible impression her early friendships and relationships left on her. Through adventures both audacious and poignant, we’ll see what brings Carrie to her beloved New York City, where her new life begins.

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One Fifth Avenue (2008)

Bushnell’s most-recent novel, “One Fifth Avenue”, is a modern-day story of old and new money, the always combustible mix that Edith Wharton mastered in her novels about New York’s Gilded Age and that F. Scott Fitzgerald illuminated in his Jazz Age tales. Decades later, Bushnell’s New Yorkers suffer the same passions as those fictional Manhattanites from eras past: The thirst for power, for social prominence, and for marriages that are successful—at least to the public eye. “Here are bloggers and bullies, misfits and misanthropes, dear hearts and black hearts, dogfights and catty squalls spun into a darkly humorous chick-lit saga,” says Publisher’s Weekly.

Lipstick Jungle (2005)

In “Lipstick Jungle”, Bushnell’s fourth novel, Bushnell explores our assumptions about gender roles in family and career. The book follows three high-powered friends as they weather the ups and downs of lives lived at the top of their game. Salon magazine called Bushnell’s work “ahead of the curve,” and once again, with “Lipstick Jungle”, Bushnell captures the paradigm of a new breed of career woman facing modern challenges and choices. “Lipstick Jungle” is the basis for the new drama on NBC, currently in its second season, and starring Brooke Shields, Kim Raver, Lindsay Price and Andrew McCarthy. Bushnell serves as an executive producer on the show.

Trading Up (2003)

Bushnell's third novel, “Trading Up” is a wickedly funny social satire about a lingerie model whose reach exceeds her grasp and whose new-found success has gone to her head. The book takes place in the months leading up to 9/11, and portrays a wearily decadent society. This sharply observant, keenly funny comedy of manners is Bushnell at her most sassy and entertaining. The New York Times has called Bushnell “The philosopher queen of the social scene.” Trading Up is currently in production at Lifetime.

Four Blondes (2000)

In her second novel, “Four Blondes”, Bushnell gives readers another uncensored look into the mating rituals of the Manhattan elite. In four novellas, Bushnell uses wry humor and frank portrayals of love and lust to deliver four clever, hilarious and socially relevant stories. “Four Blondes” was a critical and commercial success. With "Sex and the City" and "Four Blondes", Bushnell’s work spawned a new genre of fiction—the “chick-lit” phenomenon.

Sex and the City (1996)

With “Sex and the City”, Bushnell captured the country’s attention by breaking down the bedroom doors of New York’s rich and beautiful and exposing the true story of sex, love and relationships. Bushnell’s writing introduced the nation to “modelizers,” “toxic bachelors,” and the women who are looking for Mr. Big as they glide in and out of the star-studded social scene.